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Alan Wearne to launch The Selected Your Friendly Fascist – edited by Rae Desmond Jones. Sunday 21 October 2012 at the Friend In Hand Hotel, 58 Cowper Street, Glebe, NSW.

The return of the Gestner Revolution……sort of….

Rochford Street Press is proud, and a little bit surprised, to announce the double launch of P76 Issue 6 & The Selected Your Friendly Fascist, Sunday 21 October 2012 at the Friend In Hand Hotel, 58 Cowper Street, Glebe, NSW

Alan Wearne will launch THE SELECTED YOUR FRIENDLY FASCIST edited by Rae Desmond Jones:

“Your Friendly Fascist was a poetry magazine so deep underground that it caused tremors among persons of a pious literary persuasion on the dread occasions of its appearance. The magazine served as an ou
tlet for views and feelings which are not expressed in polite company. Your Friendly Fascist was not the only outrageous small literary publication of its time, but it took pleasure in divergent views. Poetry can tend to sombre pomposity, or the self –consciously polite. If there is a secret to the Fascist’s modest success, it is in the energy with which it rode on the un-ironed coat tails of unruly expression. Rae Desmond Jones and John Edwards remained at the helm of the magazine despite frequent inebriation, from the magazine’s beginnings in 1971 to its final burial with absolutely no honours at all in 1986. Rae Desmond Jones has made a selection of material that appeared in YFF and pulled together an creation that sits well with the ratbaggery tradition that was Your Friendly Fascist.”

Welcome (Archived)

Welcome to Rochford  Press. Rochford Press was set up in the late 1980s to publish P76 magazine. In all it published 5 issues of P76 which was one of the leading independent Australian Literary magazines of the late 1980’s. It also published 4 books:

  • Les Wicks (Cannibals … Humans Have Soft Centres)
  • Dipti Saravanamuttu (Statistic for the New World),
  • Rob Finlayson (Songs Ov Th City Ov Desire and Fear)
  • Mark Roberts (Stepping Out of Line).

Rochford Street Press emerged from a long slumber in late 2011 and established the on-line review site Rochford Street Review. It will shortly publish two new publications  in a limited hard copy edition. The two publications are:

  • P76 Issue 6 – The Lost Issue. This was an issue of P76 which was being compiled during 1992 and 1993 but, for a number of reasons, never saw the light of day. Now, 19 years later it is finally set to emerge into another century!
  • The Selected Your Friendly Fascist. Your Friendly Fascist was a poetry magazine so deep underground that it caused tremors among persons of a pious literary persuasion on the dread occasions of its appearance. The magazine served as an outlet for views and feelings which are not expressed in polite company. Your Friendly Fascist was not the only outrageous small literary publication of its time, but it took pleasure in divergent views. Poetry can tend to sombre pomposity, or the self –consciously polite. If there is a secret to the Fascist’s modest success, it is in the energy with which it rode on the un-ironed coat tails of unruly expression. Rae Desmond Jones and John Edwards remained at the helm of the magazine despite frequent inebriation, from the magazine’s beginnings in 1971 to its final burial with absolutely no honours at all in 1986. Rae Desmond Jones has made a selection of material that appeared in YFF and pulled together an creation that sits well with the ratbaggery tradition that was Your Friendly Fascist.

We will be posting more details soon. In the meantime, if you would like more information please contact us at contact@rochfordpress.com

Felicity Plunkett on ‘Truth in the Cage’ by Mohammad Ali Maleki

As part of her review of No Friend But the Mountains: Writing from Manus Prison by Behrouz Boochani in Australian Book Review, Felicity Plunkett says of Truth in the Cage:

Maleki tends a garden on Manus Island, yet his poems evoke images of the natural world thwarted or gone awry – ‘the autumn leaf grows green’, ‘the moon implodes’, ‘the butterfly flies back to its cocoon’. In an allegory of refoulement, everything in ‘Silence Land’ is turned back: the tree to its seed, the sea to its source, the river to its spring. In the more surreal ‘Myself’, groans swell the sky, the sea becomes stormy and fish ‘[scatter] in fear’.

The book’s first poem, ‘Dream of Death’, begins by addressing readers as ‘my dears’, and implores: ‘please, I ask you, listen’. Both Boochani and Maleki evoke the experience of there being absolutely nothing to do and the impact this has on the mind. Each writer has endured this year after year.

Although Maleki writes of blankness and weariness, in ‘Where is My Name?’, he affirms ‘I won’t neglect to report on these days’. From the ‘cursed city’ of Manus, he writes tender works of witness and consolation commemorating others people’s deaths – Hamed Shamshiripour, who died by hanging, and Aylan Kurdi, the three-year-old Syrian asylum seeker whose body was washed up on a Turkish beach. Yet for all their gentleness, these are steely poems, refusing silence and namelessness

The complete review of No Friend But the Mountains: Writing from Manus Prison can be read athttps://www.australianbookreview.com.au/abr-online-exclusives/5072-felicity-plunkett-reviews-no-friend-but-the-mountains-writing-from-manus-prison-by-behrouz-boochani, and, in the context of contemporary Australian culture and politics, this is an important review about a very important book. It is pleasing to see Maleki’s work linked with Boochani’s.

Truth in the Cage is available from https://rochfordstreetpress.com/rochford-street-press-titles/
No Friend but the Mountain, by Behrouz Boochani, is published by Picador and is available from https://www.panmacmillan.com.au/9781760555382/ 

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